Erica Chenoweth

Erica Chenoweth, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Government at Wesleyan University and director of Wesleyan’s Program on Terrorism and Insurgency Research. Chenoweth is an internationally-recognized authority on terrorism, nonviolent resistance, and counterterrorism. She is the author of three books, including Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict.

The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined

The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined

by Steven Pinker

“An exhaustive survey of violence in many forms, and a compelling (and hopeful) explanation for why it has declined.”

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A Wrinkle in Time

A Wrinkle in Time

by Madeleine L’Engle

“I wrote Madeleine L’Engle a fan letter when I was in grade school, and she replied.”

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In Dubious Battle

In Dubious Battle

by John Steinbeck

“The Hunger Games of the 1930s, when to strike meant to risk everything.”

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The Sociology of War and Violence

The Sociology of War and Violence

by Sinisa Malesevic

“Makes the controversial argument that organized violence is a relatively new phenomenon–and that the more central to human life the state becomes, the more violence we will see.”

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How We Decide

How We Decide

by Jonah Lehrer

“A detailed and fascinating account of the inner workings of human choices.”

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Inside Rebellion: The Politics of Insurgent Violence

Inside Rebellion: The Politics of Insurgent Violence

by Jeremy M. Weinstein

“A book that influenced the way I think about why insurgent groups behave
the way they do.”

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The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

by F. Scott Fitzgerald

“A classic commentary on the emptiness of the self-centered, hedonistic lifestyle.”

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Unarmed Insurrections: People Power Movements In Nondemocracies

Unarmed Insurrections: People Power Movements In Nondemocracies

by Kurt Schock

“Introduced me to the crucial idea that for nonviolent social movements to survive repression, they must (and often can) sequence their tactics between concentrated methods (like protests, demonstrations, and occupations) and dispersed methods (like strikes and boycotts).”

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Theory of International Politics

Theory of International Politics

by Kenneth N. Waltz

“An elegant foundation for contemporary theories of international relations with tremendous intellectual appeal. Every time I finished reading a paragraph, I would have a question–and the next paragraph would anticipate and address it.”

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A Short History of Nearly Everything

A Short History of Nearly Everything

by Bill Bryson

“Who knew science could be so fun?”

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