Hope College social psychologist David Myers is a communicator of psychological science to college students and the general public. His research and writings, supported by National Science Foundation grants and fellowships, have appeared in three dozen academic periodicals, four dozen magazines, and seventeen books, including textbooks for introductory and social psychology and trade books on the scientific pursuit of happiness, the powers and perils of intuition, psychology and faith, sexual orientation, and hearing loss.

Shantung Compound: The Story of Men and Women Under Pressure

Shantung Compound: The Story of Men and Women Under Pressure

by Langdon Gilkey

“A theologian’s recollections of, and reflections on, life in a World War II Japanese internment camp; provides fascinating examples of base human motives, and of occasional heroism (including that of fellow internee and former Olympian Eric Liddell of Chariots of Fire fame).”

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A Random Walk Down Wall Street

A Random Walk Down Wall Street

by Burton Malkiel

“Documents a convincing case for the efficient marketplace, and the overconfident hubris of those who believe they can outguess it.”

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Thinking, Fast and Slow

Thinking, Fast and Slow

by Daniel Kahneman

“Kahneman’s brilliant career is capped by this masterpiece magnum opus on the human mind—an engaging and provocative book that, among other things, explains why so many people disbelieve or ignore Malkiel’s persuasive data.”

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Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength

Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength

by Roy F. Baumeister & John Tierney

“One of the creative giants of social psychology teams with a gifted New York Times science writer to explain why willpower—the muscle of self-control—is so easily depleted with use but strengthened by repeated exercise, and how this understanding can enhance our lives.”

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God’s Universe

God’s Universe

by Owen Gingerich

“In three Harvard lectures, an emeritus Harvard astronomer and science historian beautifully conveys a sense of wonder and awe at our cosmos, and a deep respect for both science and religion.”

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